Resources for Answering Questions

Scouting instills values, gives youth a competitive edge and helps them become resilient adults, adults who lead. Scouting brings families together and gives them the platform for true, quality time together, where memories can be made that last a lifetime.

We also recognize that in your social circles, some may wonder about Scouting. They may ask questions about things they’ve heard or seen. They may be confused about who we are and what we do.

To help you answer those questions, we’ve put together a few tools for you.

We need to remind our communities why Scouting has thrived for more than 110-years. While we’ve evolved over the decades, along with our country, our values remain grounded in the same Scout Oath and Law.

Every family in our country should be invited and welcomed into Scouting.

If parents want their children to:

  • Be of good character
  • To experience the outdoors
  • To make friends
  • To have fun
  • To learn things that will help them navigate life
  • To be inspired to find careers and lifelong hobbies
  • To work cooperatively with peers and adults
  • And so much more

Then, they should try Scouting.

Please use the following tips and tools to help facilitate conversation as needed. You may have already received that question: “What’s going on with Scouting? What am I hearing about?”

Tell Your Story

Lead with your story. Share why you choose Scouting for your family. If you’re a volunteer, explain why. Share the impact you’re making. If they know you, they will connect with your genuine assessment.

Share How Scouting Continues

Share with them what Scouting is doing. While you can reference some national results, Scouting by the Numbers, focus on what your unit is doing locally. Share that in our local council, units have been meeting through the pandemic, either online, or in-person following all the safety guidelines of the Commonwealth. Remember that the local council has offered significant virtual programming since the start of COVID-19 including service projects, virtual campouts, activities, and advancements. The council also has a robust plan to support units with virtual and in-person programming this fall.

Ask What They Heard

Ask them what they’ve heard. If it’s related to the national bankruptcy case or the advertising they may be seeing connected to past cases of abuse, please be prepared to address those questions. Please review the following tools to help you better understand these complex issues and help you better answer questions:

If you encounter a question you can’t answer or need some help, do not hesitate to reach out to our Director of Field Service, Rick Riopelle.

Before any conversation about Scouting ends, don’t forget to invite them to join. The easiest way to do that is to invite them to join your unit and they can register online at www.BeAScout.org.




Council Key 3 Update On National BSA Bankruptcy

Dear Scouting Family,

The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) has made substantial progress in its Chapter 11 case by reaching an agreement alongside the Ad Hoc Committee of Local Councils with the Coalition of Abused Scouts for Justice, which represents a large majority of claimants in our Chapter 11 case, the Official Tort Claimants Committee (TCC), and the Future Claimants Representative (FCR). This agreement ensures that the BSA has the overwhelming support of survivors for our proposed Plan of Reorganization, which is a key step in the BSA’s path toward emerging from bankruptcy.

The national organization has agreed to contribute assets with up to $250 million in value to the Trust for survivors. Working through the Ad Hoc Committee of Local Councils, local councils have committed to making a substantial contribution in the form of $500 million of cash and properties. Local councils would also be credited with as much as $100 million to be paid from a Special Trust created under the BSA’s Plan of Reorganization that would be funded with excess payroll cash that would otherwise be contributed to the over-funded defined benefit pension plan, also known as the pension fund, so long as the pension fund is over-funded by at least $100 million at the time of payment. The establishment and operation of the Special Trust does not impact defined benefit pension plan payments to current or future retirees or the BSA’s current pension plan for current or former employees at the Mayflower Council or any other local council.

We are hopeful that this progress toward a global resolution benefits the entire Scouting community, as this agreement will help local councils like ours make contributions to the Trust without additional draw on their assets, allowing us to move forward with the national organization toward emergence as one Scouting Family.

The Mayflower Council continues to communicate with national leadership via the Ad Hoc Committee of Local Councils and is collaborating with all parties to the BSA’s Chapter 11 case to find a solution that will appropriately fund a Trust to compensate survivors while also ensuring the future of Scouting. The Mayflower Council has no plans to liquidate any of our three camping properties to fund our contribution to the Trust. We, also, understand from both the national organization and the Ad Hoc Committee that the proposed agreement will not impact any pension benefits provided to current or former employees of the Mayflower Council.

We remain as committed as ever to delivering Scouting’s unparalleled experiences to young people throughout our communities. We are providing an exciting summer of adventures and character-building activities, including Adventure Day Camp at Camp Resolute, Scouts BSA Summer Day Experience at Camp Resolute, Scouts BSA Resident Camp at Camp Squanto, and both tent and cabin camping at Nobscot Scout Reservation.

Yours in Scouting,

Ian Johnson
Council President

Josh Paulin
Council Commissioner

Bryan Feather
Scout Executive / CEO




Hands On Workshop Be A Scout & Online Apps

We are offering interactive hands on sessions for BeAScout.org pin information, online applications and online leads.

If you are a Cubmaster, Scoutmaster, crew advisor, committee chair or key three delegate, you are invited to join us for this session.

The unit key three can also delegate the authority in My.Scouting to a key three delegate to approve online youth applications. Don’t know how? Our workshop will show you!

These workshops will be hands on so be sure you have access to a computer during the workshop. Two dates available, pick the one that works for you.

July 19 Workshop Registration
August 9 Workshop Registration