2022 Silver Beaver Award Nominations

In Scouting, we say “it’s about the youth” and none of our adults are involved for the recognition, but every now and then we need to say thanks especially to those volunteers whose leadership and example has left a lasting positive impact on the program and the broader community. One way we do that is through nominating a Scouter for the Silver Beaver Award, the highest adult recognition a council can bestow. Take a few moments to reflect on volunteers within your unit or district and consider nominating them for the Silver Beaver Award.

A detailed nomination form is available by clicking here and all nominations must be received by Friday, December 3, 2021.

Completed nominations should be emailed to:  awards@mayflowerbsa.org.  The awards will be presented at the Council’s Recognition Dinner to be held January 26, 2022.

Frequently asked questions about the Silver Beaver Award:

Overview

To recognize registered Scouters of exceptional character who have provided distinguished service within a council.  The award is presented by the National Court of Honor on behalf of councils.

Who Can Earn This Award?

Anyone may nominate any deserving registered Scouter to the council, which selects recipients for the following year. Each council may process their own annual allotment of Silver Beaver awards and shall send a list of Silver Beaver awards presented each calendar year to the National Court of Honor no later than January 31 of the following year.




What is a Unit Key 3?

Unit Key 3

Behind every great Scouting unit is a committed Key 3. These are the three top adult individuals within each pack, troop, crew, or ship. Each member of the Key 3 needs to understand his or her role and feel empowered to serve.

The Unit Key 3 is a critical component to the success of the unit. The unit Key 3 consists of:

  • Committee Chair – The top volunteer in the unit is the Committee Chair. They are responsible for ensuring enough qualified adult volunteers are in place to provide the program. They lead the unit committee meetings.
  • Unit Leader – The leader of the unit meeting is the unit leader (Cubmaster, Scoutmaster, Crew Advisor, Skipper) and is responsible for developing and delivering the “program.”
  • Chartered Organization Representative (COR) – This person appoints the unit committee chair and approves all adult leaders. They provide resources from the chartered organization.

The Key 3 addresses unit challenges, checks on Journey to Excellence status, and adjusts program and administrative elements to ensure unit progress toward Journey to Excellence.

Role of the Unit Key 3

  • This group meets frequently to discuss the unit, its challenges, coming events, and progress toward completing their action plan and Journey to Excellence goals.
  • Ensures that a monthly program and unit budget plan are in place and on track. These items are critical for unit success. Encourage long-range planning for a positive experience for all.
  • Support systems that will ensure a well-organized unit are: the monthly Unit Key 3 meeting, monthly committee and leader meetings, and regular parent meetings.
  • Encourages a unit-wide communication system. Communication takes many forms: newsletter, phone tree, email, website, app. Whatever fits the unit.
  • Encourages training of all registered adults in the unit. Encourages them to take This Is Scouting and Leader Specific Training for their position prior to their first meeting. Vigorously enforces Youth Protection Training. Makes sure the adult leaders are aware of training opportunities. Through the district commissioner, enlists the help of the training team to bring adult leader training to the unit if necessary.
  • Helps unit leaders get additional training as needed. Through the unit and district commissioners, requests progressive specialty training as needed. Topics might include recruiting youth members, information on Friends of Scouting, advancement, etc. While it is the responsibility of the district committee, it may be necessary to conduct sections of this training at the unit level.
  • Encourages participation in district activities. Encourages attendance at roundtable, district activities, and camping opportunities. Keeps the district and council calendars in mind when helping the Unit Key 3 schedule unit meetings and events.

My.Scouting.org – Accomplish A Wide Varity of Things

You can use My.Scouting.org for a wide variety of things. Parents can use it to transfer their Scout from one unit to another (how-to PDF), such as when a Webelos moves from a pack to a troop. Adult leaders can use it to take position-specific training. The Key 3 can use it to accept online applications and must use it to complete the annual rechartering of their unit.

In addition to these functions, this portal provides all adults access to their personal account data, a place to update contact information, and…yes, the ability to complete YPT. Make sure your My.Scouting.org profile contains your BSA member ID number; that way, your training record will automatically update when you finish an online course. BSA member ID numbers do not transfer from one council to another, but you can include both in your profile if you have IDs from multiple councils.

When setting up a My.Scouting.org account, be sure to link it to your Mayflower Council BSA member ID number. Forgot your ID number, your username or your password? Not sure if you have a member ID number or a My.Scouting.org account? Contact the Membership & Unit Service Team (membership@mayflowerbsa.org) before you create a new account– we can check to see if you have a member ID number, provide your username, and reset your password.

In the “BSA Web Links” section of My.Scouting.org (under “Menu”), you’ll also find links to Internet Advancement, the National Safety Council Defensive Driving Course, and Service Hours Reporting. Unit leaders have access to their unit roster and other information designed to help in managing the unit.

One last note: depending on the leadership position for which you are registered, you may not see every tool that someone else has available on their dashboard. So, it’s important that when your unit recharters at the end of each year, they accurately record your leadership position.

If you have trouble logging in to My.Scouting.org, contact Office Manager Lisa Olson for assistance.

Scoutbook

Scoutbook is an advancement tracking tool. From the first knot tied to final hours of service performed, the Scouting experience is a journey like none other. And Scoutbook is your go-to tool to ensures not a moment is missed – tracking advancement, milestone achievements and all the fun along the way. It also has messaging, help forums, service, hiking, camping tracking and calendaring features.

Important Reminders for Scoutbook:

  • Adding or transferring a scout or adult to your unit’s Scoutbook account does not register them with your unit and doesn’t mean they have a valid membership. All Scouts and adult leaders must complete an application, either online or submit a paper (or PDF version) of the application. This is true whether a person is new to Scouting, changing from one pack, troop or crew to another, or even changing adult leader positions.
  • Once an application is processed, the individual should appear in your unit’s Scoutbook in approximately 24-48 hours. Wait for this sync to occur, instead of manually adding anyone.
  • Scoutbook doesn’t allow duplicate emails, so the same email address can’t be used for two accounts.
  • Your Scoutbook login is the same as your My.Scouting.org login. If you aren’t sure if you have a login, you can’t remember your login, need a password reset or you’re getting an error, contact Office Manager Lisa Olson.
  • Scoutbook Guide: help.scoutbook.scouting.org
  • Scouting Forums: discussions.scouting.org




Blue Cards Shouldn’t Make You “Blue”

Merit badges are more than learning skills. They are about Scouts exploring an interest, engaging in discussions, and being recognized. When conducted properly, the merit badge process incorporates all eight of the methods of Scouting.

The MB process has been updated slightly in the new Guide to Advancement. The 2021 edition recognizes that technological advances can provide many benefits, but the overall process is unchanged and the blue card can play an important role. Alternatives to the blue card may be accepted, as long as they include the necessary information. If electronic record-keeping methods do not encompass all the steps, blue cards may be used in addition. Most importantly, a Scout should always have a permanent, hardcopy record of his or her work.

To reiterate, whether or not blue cards are included, the complete merit badge process must be followed, starting with an initial discussion between the Scout and the unit leader about the specific merit badge. The Scoutmaster (or their designee) provides advice and guidance, maybe suggesting that the Scout would get more out of the badge if they waited, or after they finished another activity. However, it is ultimately the Scout’s decision to work on a particular merit badge at a particular time.

“Since blue cards support the merit badge process as it is intended to function, the Guide to Advancement continues to reference and recommend them. It is expected that when blue cards are not used, advancement administrators at all levels will find ways to carry on the processes, interactions, documentation, and other nuances that make the process such a critical element in BSA mission achievement.”

Guide to Advancement: Section 7.0.0.2 – About the Application for Merit Badge (“Blue Card”)

During that initial conversation the unit leader should provide contact information for at least one council approved merit badge counselor. However, if the Scout has one already in mind, they must be allowed to work with the registered and approved counselor of their choice. This initial meeting is integral to the merit badge process, and as such should be documented by the leader signing the blue card, or by other means.

The Scout next contacts the merit badge counselor, following all Youth Protection Training guidelines, and begins the process of completing the requirements. The counselor can consider work done at any time after the Scout was a registered Scouts BSA member, as long as the Scout actually and personally completed the requirement, as written.

As the Scout completes requirements, the merit badge counselor documents each by initialing and dating the spaces on the blue card, or other method. These “partial” completions do not expire until the Scout’s 18th birthday. The Scout may choose to finish the merit badge with a different counselor, who should accept the previous counselor’s certification of any requirements completed.

When all requirements are complete, the counselor records that information on the blue card, and/or by electronic means. The counselor should retain the “Counselor’s Record” portion of the blue card for at least one year, in case questions arise.

After all requirements are completed and approved by the counselor, the Scout shows the evidence of completion to the unit leader, who initiates a discussion on how it went, but does not retest the Scout. The unit leader documents this discussion as well, then the troop reports the completion to council and presents the Scout with the merit badge.

After all requirements are completed and approved by the counselor, the Scout shows the evidence of completion to the unit leader, who initiates a discussion on how it went, but does not retest the Scout. The unit leader documents this discussion as well, then the troop reports the completion to council and presents the
Scout with the merit badge.




Cub Scouts The 3 R’s: Recruit, Recruit & Retain

Of the six programs the BSA offers, typically over 50% of registered youth are in the Cub Scout program. Annually, we recruit more first graders to be Tigers than any other age group across all programs. In 2020, many units were unable or chose not to recruit in their communities. As a result, youth membership in the BSA plummeted.

It is time for a reset this fall, so everyone is being asked to focus on membership recruitment. As critical as that effort will be, data tells us that in a typical year we have had a problem with keeping them in the program. Voice of the Scout surveys have told us that families leave because of a poor den experience.

Dens are where the action happens, it’s where we conduct activities in the form of the Adventure program. Den leaders are well meaning adults who volunteered to guide a bunch of kids through a series of activities to reach the goal of completing an Adventure. Our volunteer den leaders like to have a playbook from which to draw and know what to do when holding a den meeting. They want to know what they should be doing with the youth and how to get it done. Our den leaders are not child development experts, they are parents and adults who volunteer. At the beginning of each program year, our den leaders and Cub Scouts are both stepping into the great unknown.

Advancement is how we deliver our program and measure the outcome, but advancement is not the end goal: it is a method for running a den meeting. Advancement should not define the activities to be completed; activities should lead to advancement. Cub Scouts do not have the developmental understanding of why they must complete certain requirements to “advance.” They came to the meeting to have a good time and do something fun. Typically, that’s all the Cub Scout cares about.

On the way home from a den meeting, Cub Scouts should be able to tell their families that they had FUN. They should be able to describe the meeting with glee and excitement and a need to return. If a Cub Scout looks out the car window and says, “That was boring,” chances are he or she will not be back to the next
den meeting or register for another program year.

Our challenge is to be sure den leaders are aware of the many resources available to help our leaders provide the best program possible; each and every meeting. Let’s re-set and focus on member experiences that shine and provide great fun and adventures.

BSA resources available to provide the best Cub Scout experience for new membership – youth and adult.

Cub Scouting
Cub Chat Live!
Den Leader Resources
Adult Leader Training




Cub Scout & Scouts BSA Yo-Yo Programs

Completing the Cub Scout Yo-Yo Preview Adventure and finding fun recruitment giveaways just got a lot easier. Order customized Yo-Yos, choosing your color and adding a logo, or purchase case packs of 12 Yo-Yos, prefect for making sure a den has everything they need for the Yo-Yo Preview Adventure. Duncan also offers the Yo-Yo Teen Program for Scouts BSA to fine-tune their tricks and earn patches long the way.

Cub Scout Yo-Yo Preview Adventure
Scouts BSA Yo-Yo Program




Scouting with Special Needs: The ISAP & the IEP

What is the difference between an Individual Scout Advancement Plan (ISAP) and an Individualized Education Program (IEP)? An IEP is a legal document under United States law. It is developed by a team of school personnel familiar with the student, their parent/guardian, and, as applicable, the student themself. There are legal consequences if any part of the contract is not followed. The ISAP, on the other hand, is not legally binding and should not be viewed as such. An ISAP is developed by the BSA leadership familiar with the Scout, their parent/guardian, and, as applicable, the Scout themself. An ISAP should be only about four pages in length, and it should address the specific items listed on the ISAP form and in the Guide to Advancement.

Can the Scout’s IEP be used to develop an alternative plan needed for the Scout’s success? The two documents are not interchangeable. Some of the information and supports contained in the IEP may help to develop the Scout’s ISAP. Some of the services provided to the child at school may help the Scout when working on rank requirements. But it is important to include only the relevant portions. Those who work with Scouts with special needs and are familiar with IEPs can help to develop the Scout’s ISAP. Please contact your district advancement chair for assistance.




Lifesaving and Meritorious Action Awards

Lifesaving and Meritorious Action Awards recognize registered youth and adults who have performed an attempt to save a life, or to recognize notable acts of service that put into practice Scouting skills or ideals.

Recommendations for any of the awards are submitted by unit leaders to the Council Advancement Committee for review and submission to the National Court of Honor. The awards are:

Lifesaving Awards

  • Honor Medal with Crossed Palms: Awarded in exceptional cases to youth member or adult leader who has demonstrated unusual heroism or resourcefulness in saving or attempting to save a life at extreme risk to self.
  • Honor Medal: Awarded to a youth member or adult leader who has demonstrated unusual heroism and skill in saving or attempting to save life at considerable risk to self.
  • Heroism Award: Awarded to a youth member or adult leader who has demonstrated heroism and skill in saving or attempting to save life at minimal personal risk to self.

Meritorious Action Awards

  • Medal of Merit: Awarded to a youth member or adult leader who has performed an act of service of a rare or exceptional character that reflects an uncommon degree of concern for the wellbeing of others.
  • National Certificate of Merit: Awarded to a youth member or adult leader who has performed a significant act of service that is deserving of special national recognition.
Recommendation Form




New Event Registration & Calendar Platform

Our council has begun transitioning to a new online event registration platform named Black Pug, which is used by almost half of all Boy Scout councils nationwide. The previous system, Doubleknot, was a major step forward when we adopted it nearly 16 years ago. After careful, thoughtful and detailed evaluation we believe the Black Pug platform will be an improvement, addressing multiple issues brought up by our members and volunteers and improving your experience when signing up for camps and other activities and accessing the council calendar.

The transition to Black Pug has already begun. Many of our recent events and summer camp sign-ups have been utilizing the new platform. Black Pug will soon become the new platform for the council calendar providing many of the most requested features including calendar subscription links and RSS feeds. We anticipate the full integration of Black Pug into the council website to be completed by June 1.

Individuals and units will have until July 31 to archive any data on the Doubleknot system they wish to retain and we will be sunsetting Doubleknot in Mayflower Council in early August. 

We are excited to be sharing this new event registration system with you and we thank you for your patience as we make this transition. We look forward to serving you better. If you have any questions or need assistance with Black Pug please contact Lisa Olson our Black Pug subject matter expert.




19 Cub Elective Adventures Retiring in 2022

Every year Cub Scout Adventures are reviewed to identify trends and determine interests of our youth, den leaders and Cub Scout families. In our ongoing efforts to keep the Cub Scouting Adventure program relevant to today’s families, Cub Scout elective Adventures are reviewed for both content and popularity. The most recent review has identified 19 elective Adventures that do not meet the standards of youth and den leader engagement, with the lowermost being earned by less than 3% of eligible youth. They will be retired effective May 31, 2022. The retiring of these adventures allows Cub Scouting to be more agile as we make continuous improvements to the program.

We know that some families may want one last chance to earn these Adventures. Some den leaders may have already made plans for the upcoming program year. To help with transition, these Adventures will be available until the end of 2021-2022 program year.

  • Lions – current electives will remain
  • Tigers – Family Stories, Earning Your Stripes, Tiger Tales, and Tiger Theater
  • Wolf – Collections and Hobbies, Grow Something, Hometown Heroes, Motor Away
  • Bear – Beat of the Drum, World of Sound, Make it Move, Robotics
  • Webelos & Arrow of Light – Looking Back Looking Forward, Maestro, Project Family, Build My Hero, Adventures in Science, Fit It, Movie Making

The listed elective Adventures are still part of the Cub Scouting program until May 31, 2022. After that date, these Adventures will be retired and the Adventure loops and pins will no longer be available. Earned Adventures will be archived in Scoutbook and Internet Advancement. The Adventure will appear as earned but will no longer be able to be marked as completed after May 31, 2022.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why are these Elective Adventures being retired?

  • In our ongoing efforts to keep the Cub Scouting adventure program relevant to today’s families, Cub Scout elective adventures are reviewed for content and popularity. These 19 adventures are the least popular among Cub Scouts based on sales and advancement data. The retiring of these adventures allows Cub Scouting to be more agile as we make continuous improvements to the program.

Why May 31, 2022?

  • We understand that some families may want one last chance to earn these adventures and some Den Leaders may have already made plans for the next program year, so we are giving a full program year to allow for this transition. June 1st is when the vast majority of Cub Scouts have transitioned to the next rank.

Can Cub Scouts still earn these Adventures in the 2021-22 program year?

  • Yes! These elective adventures can still be earned during the 2021-22 program year. These 19 Adventures will remain part of the program until May 31, 2022.

What happens on May 31, 2022?

  • Effective May 31, 2022 these Elective Adventures will no longer be considered part of the Cub Scouting program and the Adventure Loops and Pins for these Cub Scout Adventures will no longer be available for purchase. Earned adventures will be archived in Scoutbook and Internet Advancement and will appear as earned but will no longer be able to be marked as completed after May 31, 2022.

Can Cub Scouts still wear the Adventure Loops and Pins after they retire?

  • Absolutely! In Scouting once an adventure is earned it is never taken away. These adventures are still considered official program and may continue to be worn after they retire on May 31, 2022.




Virtual Little Philmont 2021

Join Hundreds of Other Scouters at the Virtual Little Philmont 2021 Event and Get a Taste of the Philmont Experience

Friday, May 21 from 9pm-10:30pm EDT
Saturday, May 22 from 10:30-2pm EDT

Virtual Little Philmont 2021 provides a unique opportunity to hear from leading Scouters who continue to deliver high-quality programs for our youth. Several topics will be addressed with a variety of focused break-out sessions on subjects like recruiting, involving parents, leading a troop, helping Scouts stay engaged “after Eagle,” utilizing digital tools to reach your Scouting audience, and more. This exciting event can be a catalyst for increased knowledge and energy within the Latter-day Saint Scouting community.

We’ll open the event on Friday evening (May 21st) with a fireside chat with Rex Tillerson, former BSA National President, former U.S. Secretary of State and former Chairman/CEO of ExxonMobil.

We’ll continue the event on Saturday morning (May 22nd), addressing various topics necessary to continue Scouting with energy, increased knowledge, and enthusiasm. Come join us!

Register Now
Facebook Page
Website Link