Virtual Little Philmont 2021

Join Hundreds of Other Scouters at the Virtual Little Philmont 2021 Event and Get a Taste of the Philmont Experience

Friday, May 21 from 9pm-10:30pm EDT
Saturday, May 22 from 10:30-2pm EDT

Virtual Little Philmont 2021 provides a unique opportunity to hear from leading Scouters who continue to deliver high-quality programs for our youth. Several topics will be addressed with a variety of focused break-out sessions on subjects like recruiting, involving parents, leading a troop, helping Scouts stay engaged “after Eagle,” utilizing digital tools to reach your Scouting audience, and more. This exciting event can be a catalyst for increased knowledge and energy within the Latter-day Saint Scouting community.

We’ll open the event on Friday evening (May 21st) with a fireside chat with Rex Tillerson, former BSA National President, former U.S. Secretary of State and former Chairman/CEO of ExxonMobil.

We’ll continue the event on Saturday morning (May 22nd), addressing various topics necessary to continue Scouting with energy, increased knowledge, and enthusiasm. Come join us!

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Transfer & Multiple Now Done On My.Scouting

On the “My Application” tab you can transfer yourself as an adult volunteer or your youth member from
unit to unit.

Unit leaders will be able to transfer youth by going to the new “Roster” feature in “Member Manager” and “Organization Manager” and select the youth who
need to be transferred, then click the “Transfer” icon.

This will create a transfer application which will be sent to the new unit with the ability to be approved in “Application Manager”.

Transfers will take 48 hours to sync with the new unit.

The “Roster” tool also allows unit leaders to email other leaders in the unit directly from the tool.

Editing youth and adult profiles, and printing rosters and membership cards is also available in the updated tool.




New Video Resources Can Help Den Leaders

With the pandemic limiting some in-person activities, these videos offer an easy-to-deliver virtual alternative for leaders.Your Content Goes Here




Council Support For Units & Scout Families

What Does Mayflower Council Do For Units & Scout Families?

To help unit leaders, the council maintains a service center with administrative staff to:

  • Process registrations, Boys’ Life subscriptions, and special requests to the National Service Center and other organizations.
  • Maintain a supply of literature, insignia, forms, certificates, etc., needed by the leader to carry on the unit’s program.
  • Keep records of advancement, membership, training, etc. necessary to unit operation.
  • Publish a weekly newsletter to keep leaders informed of the latest local and national Scouting news, coming events, etc.
  • Produce notices, minutes, agendas, etc., for district and council committees that are developing programs for leader and unit benefit.
  • Handle inquiries and visitors to our service center for information related to unit operation and Scouting procedures.
  • Provide a myriad of forms, applications, certificates and literature helpful in the unit program.
  • Produce district and council calendars and schedules, programs, kits and special aids to assist leaders and their committees.
  • Manage reservations for long-term camping, short-term camps, camporees, jamborees, high adventure bases, training courses, meetings, annual council and district meetings, troop leader and den leader events.

To protect the unit leader, the council:

  • Maintains a liability policy for the protection of all leaders and chartered organizations.
  • Maintains accident and sickness insurance policy for all registered youth and leaders.
  • Screens requests for services and money earning proposals, guarding against improper use of Scouting for commercialism and exploitation.
  • Has staff members available on what is practically an around-the-clock, around-the-calendar basis to meet any emergency.
  • Manages and processes CORI checks
  • Provides assistance with any Youth Protection issues that may arise.

To help the leader develop unit program, the council provides without charge:

  • Program helps, calendar of activities, meetings and special events.
  • Awards, such as ribbons, certificates, recruiting awards, etc.
  • Recruitment supplies including posters, fliers and other materials.
  • Sample ceremonies, parent’s night program outlines, training aids, etc.
  • Source materials and personnel.
  • Materials, books, pamphlets, folders, videos and special helps from the National Council and cooperating organizations.

In the field of camping and outdoor activities, the council:

  • Maintains three Scout camps, with a total of 1,500 acres, for year-round camping and Cub Scout family outdoor events. Our Scout camps serve as year-round activities, camping and training centers.
  • Offers units the use of equipment for short-term, weekend, and year-round camping.
  • Covers costs of camp improvement, repairs, replacement, maintenance, insurance and administration. These and other charges are not paid for by Scout’s fees.
  • Employs full-time camp rangers for the protection of the Scout camps and the convenience of units using facilities. They keep these facilities ready and available for unit and family use.
  • Provides campers’ early-bird savings discounts, unit leaders’ guidebook, camp videos, literature and other aids to help units with their program.
  • Provides scholarships or “camperships” for Scouts who need some financial help to have a summer camp experience.
  • Offers units and individual youth access to high-adventure bases like Philmont Scout Ranch, Northern Tier and Sea Base, national jamborees, field days, camporees and other special events. These would not exist without the council giving leadership and coordination.

In educational and relationship building programs, the council provides the leader with:

  • A library of videos, digital projectors and screens for use in training and promotional programs.
  • Informal and formal training courses with most of the cost of literature and materials, etc., and all the staff time included in the council budget.
  • Monthly roundtables for the benefit of leaders, committee persons, assistants, and den leaders, providing materials, staff and other costs.
  • Scouter’s Key, training awards, Den Leader’s Training Award, Silver Beaver, District Award of Merit and other Scouter recognitions.
  • A merit badge counselor corps in more than 130 subjects.
  • A variety of advancement forms and certificates without charge.

Providing the unit with district and council activities and service, the council:

  • Plans and conducts various types of activities in which units participate such as Merit Badge University, Pinewood Derby and Scouting for Food.
  • Organizes camporees, Cub Scout day camps, jamborees, high-adventure trips, absorbing some overhead costs to keep participants’ expenses to a minimum.
  • Works with various community groups to arrange for Scout participation in civic affairs and Good Turn projects.
  • Recruits and trains a corps of commissioners for assisting with unit program and maintaining standards.

To assist leaders, the council employs a trained full-time staff who counsel, guide and inspire:

  • Through person-to-person counseling on unit relationships, administrative and operational problems.
  • Through guidance of all committees, commissioners, roundtables, meetings, conferences, courses, district and council activities in the development of programs that directly benefit leaders and units.
  • Through contacts with the community resources (clubs, churches, government, etc.), secure help for all units that they alone could not obtain. The use of parks, recreational areas, use of buildings for special events, picnic areas, campsites, and meeting facilities are a few examples.




National BSA Member Fee Increase

Dear Scouting Family,

Today the National Council of the Boy Scouts of America announced an increase to the annual membership fees. These increases are a result of rising operational costs and COVID-19, which has created a substantial unplanned loss of revenue due to mandated Scout Shop closures and shortened high adventure base seasons.

Locally, our council is also facing financial challenges and we are doing our best to address the impact of three months of office closure, activity cancellations, diminished fundraising campaigns, and the loss of some of our summer camp season. We know, however, that our staff and volunteers will continue to do their best to offer high-quality Scouting experiences during these challenging times.

We understand many of our Scouting families are also dealing with similar financial issues. We do not want finances to be a barrier to participation in Scouting, and will do our best to assist families who need it, to the fullest extent possible.

We are aware some of our members may have heard about these fee changes this weekend via social media. The Mayflower Council did not share this information previously because the National Council requested that all councils wait until June 1st before distributing this news. Some councils, unfortunately, chose to share the information prematurely, which may have spawned some confusion. The Mayflower Council apologizes for any inconvenience this action may have caused.

Please review the infographic below. Click here to view the frequently asked questions about the fee increase. As more information is released, we will share the most up to date information here.

Thank you for your continued dedication to our Scouts. As Scouting navigates these turbulent times, we stand together to achieve our shared mission: helping young people in our community learn, grow, and thrive.

If you have specific questions regarding these changes, please contact your district executive or email us.

Yours in Scouting,

Mike Rotar
Council President

Josh Paulin
Council Commissioner

Bryan Feather
Scout Executive / CEO




Inaugural Class of Female Eagle Scout Extension

Details on Extension for Eagle Boards of Review for Those Who Wish to Be in the Inaugural Class of Female Eagle Scouts

These are historic times for our Movement. The coronavirus pandemic is having a direct impact in many Scouts’ ability to continue on their trail to Eagle – especially having completed all their requirements prior to the boards of review that are to be held from 10/1-31/2020.

Because we want all girls who joined in 2019 and wish to be a part of the Inaugural Class of female Eagle Scouts to have the benefit of such an experience, and after carefully considering recommendations from stakeholders, including feedback from volunteers and professionals, we will be extending the period for boards of review from 10/1/2020 – 1/31/2021. To further support the Inaugural Class, all boards of reviews will be dated with the same date by the National Service Center.

While this notice discusses the Inaugural Class of female Eagle Scouts, the lengthening of the Eagle board of review window is applicable to all Scouts who were granted the inaugural extension, regardless of gender.

As a reminder, all requirements must be completed while the individual is a registered member of Scouts BSA, or as a member of a Venturing crew or a Sea Scouts ship after achieving First Class in Scouts BSA, per the Guide to Advancement.




Play Family Feud with your Patrol

Troop 314 Scoutmaster Paul has collected answers from Scouters around our district. Top 100 answers on the board!

 

Download the attached excel file to have the categories and answers for your virtual game of Family Feud, Scouting Patrol edition!

 




Requesting Extensions for Advancement

Preliminary Note: the National Council of the BSA released new guidelines for Rank Advancement for all Scouting programs during COVID-19 related social distancing.  There has been an update to the Rank Advancement COVID-19 FAQ on 1/5/2021 – please click the link to see those updates (marked with a diamond)

https://www.scouting.org/coronavirus/covid-19-faq/

Step 1 – Is the Scout eligible for an Extension?2021-02-05T16:35:11-05:00

  • These extensions are available only to youth members who qualify under the three tests listed in the below explanation from the 2021 edition of the Guide to Advancement (GTA)
  • “Time Extensions” 9.0.4.0 – posted below

Note from Mayflower Council:
Council Advancement Committees have been told that after Dec. 31, 2020, there is no plan to authorize COVID-19 extensions as has been allowed during 2020. It is possible, however, that as of Jan. 1, 2021, COVID-19 could become a circumstance that warrants an extension if it qualifies under the three tests listed in 9.0.4.0, below.

9.0.4.0 Time Extensions

If a Scout foresees that due to no fault or choice of his or her own, it will be impossible to complete the Eagle Scout rank requirements before age 18 may apply to the local council for a limited time extension.  These should be granted only when necessary and are reserved only for work on Eagle.  When a time extension is requested, the Scout should continue working on the requirements until a final decision is delivered.   In most cases, unless the National Council has issued other direction, a request must meet the three tests listed below to be approved.

Sea Scouts or Venturers who foresee that due to no fault or choice of their own, it will be impossible to complete the Quartermaster or Summit requirements before age 21, must use the same tests, process, and form described in topics 9.0.4.0, 9.0.4.1, and 9.0.4.2 to request a limited time extension.

The Three tests to see if a Scout is eligible for an extension:

Test #1:
1. The member joined or rejoined (or became active again after a period of inactivity, or became refocused on advancement after a period of inattention) in time to complete all requirements before turning 18.

Test #2:
2. Through no fault or choice of the Scout, an unforeseen circumstance or life changing event with severe consequences has come to exist that now precludes completion of the requirements before the deadline.

Examples might include, but are not limited to, a hospital stay, disabling injury, significant personal or family incident or issue, natural disaster, severe unseasonable weather, or the actions of others (see below the line, “Misinformation from adults in positions of authority”). If the circumstance is health related, it should have been unforeseen and of recent onset, or a complication or intensification of an ongoing issue.

Test #3:
3. The circumstance is beyond the control of the Scout, could not have been anticipated or planned for, and was not or cannot be resolved in time to complete the requirements.

Misinformation from adults in positions of authority
Since we teach obedience as one of the Scout Laws, it follows that guidance and direction from an adult leader carries significant weight. Adults who are misinformed about advancement requirements and timing have, at times, created circumstances that necessitated extensions. Councils must consider the circumstances of each case. If it can be established that a Scout followed incorrect guidance and direction in good faith, then Test #2—as it relates to the actions of others—may be considered fulfilled, even though the Scout has a handbook and should have read it.

Applying the three tests
Whether a request for extension meets the three tests above requires the exercise of carefully considered and debated judgement. If the council advancement committee is unsure about whether an extension should be granted, the National Council encourages local councils to find in favor of the Scout.

Step 2 – Process for Requesting and Reviewing a Time Extension – GTA Section 9.0.4.12021-02-05T16:36:34-05:00

See “Process for Requesting and Reviewing a Time Extension,” 9.0.4.1, written below:

To begin this process, please use this form: 11.2.0.0 Request for Extension of Time to Earn the Eagle Scout Rank

Please email AdvancementExtension@mayflowerbsa.org to let them know to expect this, and to get their guidance and suggestions on how to proceed

Who is able to get an extension? – These are available only to youth who qualify according to the three tests listed in “Time Extensions,” 9.0.4.0 (please read section above).

Who can request an extension for a Scout? – A Scout, his or her parent or guardian, unit leader, or members of the unit committee may file such requests.

Who reviews these requests for extension? – The Council Advancement Committee must research and evaluate requests and recommend decisions to the Scout Executive.  A subcommittee in the Council Advancement Committee will be in touch with all individuals involved in the reason for the extension.  A letter from the Committee and the Scout Executive will be sent out if/when the extension is granted.  This is explained in items #2 and #3 below.

How long may these extensions be? – Councils have the authority to grant Scouts only enough time to complete the requirements, but not more than a total of six months after the 18th birthday. Under most circumstances, however, three to four months has proven sufficient. This is explained in item #4 below.   If a council denies a request or the Scout needs more than six months, an appeal process is discussed in “Appealing a Time Extension Denial,” 9.0.4.2, this is explained in item #5 below.

Note from the BSA: Definition of a month

Note as stated on page 2 of the Guide to Advancement a month is a month regardless how many days it has. It is not defined as 30 days or four weeks. For example, the maximum extension of six months means the time period beginning on the Scout’s 18th birthday up to the corresponding day six months later, for example, February 2 up to August 2 or August 30 up to February 28 (or 29th if leap year). In essence, the extension expiration date acts like a pseudo 18th birthday, prior to which all requirements must be fulfilled. Six months does not mean 180 days.

How to Request an Extension2021-02-05T16:38:02-05:00

  1. Requesting an extension

Requests for time extensions must be submitted to the Mayflower Council Advancement Committee via email to AdvancementExtension@mayflowerbsa.org or by mail to the attention of the staff advisor for advancement or other council designated advancement administrator.

The form, “Request for Extension of Time to Earn the Eagle Scout Rank” (GTA Appendix, 11.2.0.0) may be used for this purpose.

Since council-granted extensions expire no more than six months after the Scout’s 18th birthday, it is wise to submit requests well before a Scout turns 18 years old. For the same reason, Scouts should be encouraged to continue work on advancement throughout the extension request process.

Requests must:

(a) Explain why or how the circumstances necessitate an extension

(b) indicate the number of months believed to be necessary to complete the requirements

(c) explain how that period of time was determined and,

(d) include documentation of the circumstances. (See “Time Extensions,” 9.0.4.0 above on this webpage)

    • If a cause is health related, a statement from a health professional must be provided. All documentation and supporting evidence submitted must be dated and include the name of the author.
  1. The council’s role in evaluating extension requests

The Mayflower Council Advancement Committee understands that time is of the essence.  This committee meets monthly through most of the year, however, ad hoc meetings are called to discuss and vote on special case extension situations.

A request for extension will be investigated by a subcommittee of the Council Advancement Committee composed of registered adults who are familiar with Scouts BSA advancement.  They will conduct interviews with as many people with knowledge of the case as possible and obtain detailed written statements from them or prepare written summaries of what is said.  A thorough review will likely include the Scout themselves, Scoutmasters, parents, adults registered in the Troop, Eagle coaches, or more in the process, as necessary.  This effort must also include any adults who committed errors or provided misinformation and who are reasonably available.

The results of the investigation are then reported to the council advancement committee to deliberate and vote on a recommendation to the Scout Executive, who has final authority on the extension decision (see item #3 below).

All documentation, statements, notes, and any other information collected are retained.  They are retained for any situation including the successful rank advancement through a board of review, where this material must be included, OR in the event of a denial and subsequent appeal. (See item #5 below, “In the event of denial.”, for information and form)

  1. The Scout executive’s role

If after receiving the recommendation of the council advancement committee, the Scout Executive approves an extension, a letter is sent to the Scout, his or her parent or guardian, the unit leader, and the petitioner who initially submitted the request. A copy of the letter is placed
in the council’s unit file. The letter will include the following: (a) the date the extension expires—no later than six months after the 18th birthday (see above, “Definition of a month”), (b) a statement that the Scout must complete the requirements prior to that expiration date, and (c) a requirement that a copy of this letter must be attached to the Eagle Scout application when it is submitted to the council. The board of review and submission of the Eagle application and other paperwork may take place after the expiration date. The Eagle application is entered into the BSA system.

In the event the Scout Executive disagrees with the council advancement committee’s recommendation—whether about approval, the length of an extension, or denial—the Scout executive is consults with the advancement committee chair in order to clarify any misunderstanding of advancement policies and procedures or any recommendation requires more supporting evidence. If agreement is not reached, the Scout Executive’s decision stands.  See item #5 “In the event of denial” for more steps that can be taken after that.

  1. Extensions of more than six months

A six-month extension allows for completion of time-oriented requirements such as position of responsibility, active participation, and those found in some required merit badges.  Council’s are given guidance from the BSA that in the unlikely event a Scout requires more than six months, the Council must deny the request.

  1. In the event of denial

If a Scout is denied an extension, a letter is prepared and sent to the Scout, his or her parent or guardian, the unit leader, and the petitioner who initially submitted the request. The letter will explain the reason for the decision and how to appeal it to the National Council. A copy of the letter is placed in the council’s unit file. Only the Scout or his or her parent or guardian may initiate an appeal of an extension denial.

See  “Appealing a Time Extension Denial” GTA section 9.0.4.2 and form from the GTA: 11.2.1.0 Appeal of Extension Request Denial

Scouts with disabilities — choosing between extension or registration beyond the age of eligibility2021-02-05T16:39:21-05:00

Note from Mayflower Council: Requesting an extension for Rank advancement is typically because of an unforeseen, sudden circumstance that hinders a Scout that would have otherwise been able to finish their rank advancement.  Registration beyond the age of eligibility is for Scouts that have permanent and severe disabilities that gives them special consideration to continue as a participant in the Scouting program (advancement, activities, training, etc.) beyond the age of 18.   The age of eligibility is defined as (18-y-o for Scouts BSA, 21-y-o for Venturing and Sea Scouts)

Please read the descriptions below from the GTA to understand if your Scout should request an extension or registration beyond the age of eligibility:

In most cases, Scouts are expected to overcome life’s ordinary trials. Cause for an extension requires an extraordinary circumstance uncommon to the Scout. Known circumstances, such as moderate learning disabilities or ADD/ADHD, that the Scout has faced over many years and has coped with in the past should not suddenly become an issue shortly before the Scout’s 18th birthday. Council advancement committees, however, might consider exceptions and grant extensions to Scouts with significant disabilities that do not meet the level of severity or permanence required for registration beyond the age of eligibility, but are such that they essentially preclude advancement within the timeframe allowed.

Scouts with permanent and severe disabilities such as those described in section 10, “Advancement for Members With Special Needs,” have the opportunity to be registered beyond the age of eligibility. (See link: “Registering Qualified Members Beyond Age of Eligibility,” 10.1.0.0.) They do not need to request an extension, but please read the documentation required for the Council to review and deliberate in order to grant this registration.

Examples from Section 10.1.0.0 of the GTA of conditions that, if severe, may be criteria that qualify a youth for registration beyond the age of eligibility:

    • Autism spectrum disorders
    • Blind or sight-impaired
    • Deaf or hard of hearing
    • Cognitive disability
    • Developmental delay
    • Down syndrome
    • Emotional or behavioral disorder
    • Physically disabled
    • Traumatic brain injury
    • Multiple coexisting disabilities

Advance copies of these topics and forms are also published at www.scouting.org/advancement.




Planning Your Next Den Meeting Just Got Easier

If you’re a den leader, you’re going to love the latest update to Scoutbook! The Boy Scouts of America’s online tool for tracking Scouting advancement just rolled out a new update that’s going to make it easier than ever for den leaders to prepare for and lead meetings, track advancement and attendance, and more. 




Guide to Safe Scouting Has Been Updated

All participants in official Scouting activities should become familiar with the Guide to Safe Scouting. The Guide to Safe Scouting is an overview of Scouting policies and procedures gleaned from a variety of sources. For some items, the policy statements are complete. Unit leaders are expected to review the additional reference material cited prior to conducting such activities.

The Guide to Safe Scouting has been updated for 2019. Download or view the latest version by clicking here

UPDATES TO THE GUIDE TO SAFE SCOUTING:

  1. Updated language throughout to reference “Scouts BSA” rather than “Boy Scouts.”
  2. Youth Protection and Adult Leadership Clarified language in the Adult Supervision and Accommodations sections.
  3. Camping Updated information about Webelos overnight camping. Corrected publication number for Pack Overnight. 
  4. Campout Site Appraisal Form and provided URL to access form. 
  5. Sports and Activities Clarified Sea Scout participation in Climbing and Rappelling section. 
  6. Animal and Insect Hazards Replaced entire chapter. 
  7. Incident Reporting Provided URL for incident reporting. 
  8. Appendix Replaced Event Safety Checklist.

For more information about Scouting Safety click here.